How people learn

We might sum up the new insights by looking at three key research findings  identified in the landmark book on How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience  and School (Bransford, Brown & Cocking, 2000):

Research Finding 1:  The learning of new information is based on what  a person already knows.  Students come with preconceptions about  how the world works.  If their initial understanding is not engaged, they  may fail to grasp the new concepts and information that are taught, or  they may learn them for purposes of a test but revert to their  preconceptions outside of class.

Implication for instructors:   Instructors should draw out and work with  the preexisting understandings that students bring with them.  

Research Finding 2:  Gaining competence in a subject involves the  active construction of rich memory structures as a basis for usable  knowledge.  To develop competence, students must 

  • Have a deep foundation of basic knowledge,
  • Develop a conceptual framework to understand how facts and ideas are related, and 
  • Organize knowledge in ways that facilitate retrieval and application.

 A deep information base and a conceptual framework help a person to apply ideas to new  situations and to learn related information more quickly.

Implication for instructors:  Help learners to develop a deeper  conceptual understanding of a subject by focusing time and attention  on the core concepts of a discipline. Trying to cover all topics in a  subject area can result in content overload, too little time, or superficial  learning. 

Research Finding 3:  Knowing how to learn includes knowing how to  monitor and regulate the learning process.  The self‐regulation of  learning is referred to as “metacognition” or having the awareness and  ability to plan, monitor, and adapt learning strategies to accomplish the  task.  A metacognitive approach to instruction can help students to take  control of their learning by defining learning goals related to their  interests and monitoring their progress in achieving them.

Implication for instructors:  The teaching of metacognitive skills should  be integrated into the curriculum with the goal of helping students to  develop independence and self‐regulation in learning.